Wednesday, 20 June 2018

#11 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral - Gothenburg


Gothenburg!

This is the second last destination on my Baltic cruise and the weather has turned rainy. After so many days of wonderful weather, I had to work hard not to let it take the shine off visiting this wonderful new city.

Sailing into Gothenburg harbour on the Gota alv River (forgive the lack of proper accents), the city ranges on both sides of the river its buildings nestled into low and craggy foothills. Remnants of the city’s shipbuilding past are still arresting on the skyline, some of the large cranes left as reminders of the golden days of Gothenburg shipping and maritime history.

Once again, I was onto a coach to do a 3-hour tour of the city’s highlights. The viewpoint at the Masthuggskyrkan (church) affords fabulous views of the city, even on a rainy day.

Botanic Gardens Gothenburg Sweden
After a short photo stop at the Masthuggskyrkan, I was whisked off through narrow city roads to the Gothenburg Botanical Gardens. Wandering up the pathways towards the summit of the gardens, the plantings were spectacular the drizzly rain not a problem at all. I’m not convinced the guide took us up as far as we could possibly go, and we only covered a small area of the whole gardens, but the walk of close to an hour was really excellent since I’ve been cooped up on coaches for a lot of the time on this trip. That was my choice, and I’m not complaining about what’s been achieved, but the fresh air today was lovely. It was light rain, and not cold at around 14 deg C. I’m sure The Botanic Gardens are a very popular spot on a sunny day. The tour guide pointed out other public parks as we traversed the city, in part giving the city its name of being a ‘green’ city.

Another stop took us to the fantastic Fish Church - Feskekorka. What a plethora of fish there is for sale in this cute building that really does resemble a church. The tour guide joked that people go there not to worship God but to worship COD. And I did see cod being sold among the many other fishes that I couldn’t identify since the names meant nothing to me as I read them.

Poseidon Gothenburg
We stopped for a very quick photo stop at the top of the Avenue (Kungsportsavenyen) at Gotaplatsen to admire the cultural area. Buildings around this square include the Museum of Art, Concert Hall, the City Theatre - with the main Library close by. The highlight of this square is the Statue of Poseidon. It’s a fairly large sculpture by  Carl Miles, the naked Poseidon having quite an arresting face that has a ‘fish’ quality to  it that I find hard to explain.

After a few more photo stops and a very interesting commentary, I was almost back to the Balmoral. One last stop was made to an area that had an interesting past. David Carnegie (not Andrew) came to the area to set up a sugar industry on the quayside and in doing so he imported both personnel to run his operation and also reminders from Scotland. He built a tiny community around his industry with housing, school and other associated buildings. One of the fine remains of his community is the small church he built which is said to have been a replica of a church in Balquhidder, Scotland.

As I sail out of Gothenburg after yet another whistle stop tour I’ll be dining at ‘The Grill’ the more exclusive dining experience aboard the Balmoral. It isn’t the last formal night- that’s likely to be tomorrow or the last night on board but my husband and I will be sprucing up for our special dinner.

One more port to visit tomorrow and that will be Oslo, Norway! Another city I’ve never yet been to.

Slainthe!

Tuesday, 19 June 2018

#10 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral - Stockholm


Stockholm Skyview!

Since my time in Stockholm wasn’t long, I opted for a city tour with the added highlight of a ride in the Skyview and then had time for a short stroll around the old town before embarking the ship once more.

There was a minor time constraint at Stockholm that hadn’t yet happened on this cruise, but did occur on my Greenland cruise last year. The Balmoral ship was at anchor a short way out from the harbour at Stockholm and anyone leaving the ship had to be ferried by Balmoral ‘tenders’ back and forth to the shore, a journey of only a few minutes. This was incredibly well-organised by Olsen representatives, on the way to the city and there was only a slight wait of some ten minutes in a queue to return to the ship.


Like other cities already visited on this cruise, Stockholm has many beautiful buildings built in the classical styles with pastel facades. However, one difference in some of these buildings is that builders in Stockholm had (have) access to local stone, and granite is a popular building material.

Stockholm is another city that has many islands (14) connected by bridges (57) across bodies of water, like St. Petersburg, Copenhagen and Tallinn. Our guide, however, was fond of telling me that it’s really only 2 masses of water that have to be crossed in Stockholm -  a lake and the Baltic Sea.   

I really enjoyed the commentary as my coach made its way around the islands, one in particular that I’d like to have spent more time on. This was a small island that houses many museums including a Viking Museum, The Abba Experience, and numerous other small museums. My guide was also at pains to tell me that Sweden has no Viking remains of note. No Viking ships have been found, and nothing else that she considered to be substantial Viking remains - unlike those that have been found in Norway and Denmark.

My Skyview experience was similar to many other lifts and city tower-top viewing platforms that I’ve visited, all of which give a circular view of the cityscape from the top. My main impression on overlooking Stockholm was that I didn’t expect the city to be so flat, though with some 7 million inhabitants (according to the guide) I’m sure they’re quite happy that their bridge building didn’t need the additional infrastructure needed to wend around foothills as well.

The Skyview, however, does boast of itself as being a unique feature. The gondola scales the outside of the World’s biggest dome. It comes to rest for some 6 minutes at the top and a 360 deg panorama can be appreciated by Skyview visitors. I’m glad that the day was only a little cloudy because the view really is very good from the top.

The Skyview Dome is part of a complex of four arena spaces that house many different forms of entertainment. Ice hockey, football, major concerts and gigs are only a few of the options for entertainment in these huge spaces.

After my coach tour dropped me back at the harbour-side there was time for a quick walk around the cobbled streets of Gamla Stan- the old town of Stockholm. The ones I wandered onto were narrow, mostly pedestrian and full of coffee stops and eating places. Since I had to be in the queue for a ‘tender’ back to the ship by 3 p.m., I opted not to eat lunch out in case it took too long.

Slainthe!

#9 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral - St. Petersburg


More fabulous St. Petersburg delights! 

My other two guided tours in St. Petersburg were a city coach tour and a trip to the Gulf of Finland. The first mentioned tour gave me a 3 hour taste of the main public buildings which are absolutely fantastic considering their age and the climate.

I’m very glad to have been given a brief overview during the port talks by Ian Gunn and Simon Rees because I’d otherwise not have realised that the fabulous buildings are brick built rather than made of solid stone. The harsh winters must be severe on the facades of the mainly neo-classical buildings but it’s clear that massive expense is being shouldered to repaint them on a regular basis.

Being driven around the city centre was actually a much more pleasant experience than in Copenhagen. There was a lot of traffic in St. Petersburg and some of the streets were also relatively narrow but the traffic seemed to flow more easily in St. Petersburg. I will have to find some time slots when I return home to make new Pinterest Boards from my hundreds of photos taken in St. Petersburg.

The second trip out to the Gulf of Finland gave me the opportunity to see a lot of what’s considered the social housing of St. Petersburg. Our guide had said that almost everyone lived in apartment buildings and I was keen to see if there was a big difference between those in the city centre and the outskirts. I was delighted to find that the high-rises of the suburbs seem to compete equally in terms of trying to make each building a tiny bit different from its neighbour. Some post WWII housing was pointed out to us, but it was clear that many of those blocks are undergoing current renovation programmes and we drove through no areas of deprivation. That cannot be said for a lot of UK cities that I’ve been to in recent years.

Our Lady of Kazan
The stop at the Church of Our Lady of Kazan was fairly brief but I’m always amazed to find incredible architecture in the middle of what seems to be the forest fringes.

Built in the traditional Russian Orthodox style, the church is an overload of fancy but amazing to look at. It wasn’t nearly as old as I thought, having been built at the end of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth centuries. Inside was a wealth of gilded Russian Orthodox iconography.

The road we took out of the city to the Gulf of Finland was a single carriageway road that was very busy but the fact that our tour left at 8 am gave us an advantage in using the road early. Our guide pointed out that the wide bay area from St. Petersburg around the Gulf of Finland is popular for city dwellers to visit their ‘dachas’ or other second country homes- of varying sizes. An escape to the forest and countryside is common but the fact that my visit occurred during exceptionally fine weather meant more St. Petersburg dwellers were taking advantage of the weather window.
pavilion at Ilya Repin's Penaty estate

We visited the Penaty Estate ‘Dacha’ Museum of famous Russian artist Ilya Repin. We were unable to gain inside access but the building had a fascinating construction. I expect what I saw was a simple and fairly typical frontage but the building had a most impressive multiple-glazed roof area to the rear of the building which I imagine maximised the light at all times of day in different rooms of the house. Repin had also built a retreat in the garden, the front columns of which resembled an Egyptian temple.

The last bit of the tour was a paddle in the Gulf of Finland at one of the tiny beach areas. Though not compulsory at all, I dipped my toes into the Gulf but have to say it actually wasn’t that clean. A greenish hue to it wasn’t particularly natural though there were locals swimming in it. A fellow coach traveller pointed out a dead fish floating only a quarter of a metre from my feet, so I decided that the experience was over!

St. Petersburg is an altogether fascinating city that needed a lot more time spent on it than I was able to on this cruise. I’m totally delighted to have been able to sample even just a taster session.

Slainthe!

#8 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral-St. Petersburg Hermitage


The Hermitage Museum - St. Petersburg

The Winter Palace- Hermitage Museum

My short visit to the Hermitage Museum was as impressive as the one I made to the Vatican Museums, Rome, in 2016. My Vatican Museums tour was around 5 hours so I saw a lot more there than my 3 hour tour of The Hermitage in St. Petersburg. Both museums are equally grand and both show displays of obscene wealth. However, putting the origins of the funding for the construction and collection acquisition aside, since I love history, art history, and architecture, I can appreciate the glories for their stunning visual impacts and for the efforts of the artists in creating the masterpieces.

But… it’s always hard to equate the lavish budgets that were spent on acquiring the exhibits in comparison to the living conditions of the poor who were, in general, heavily taxed in some way to help pay for  them- whether they were the faithful Roman Catholic flock, or the serfs of the Czar.

My initial impression, after visiting the Vatican multiple museums, was that the best aspect of the Vatican acquiring those treasures over centuries is that they have managed to keep the treasures secure for centuries. The limited access to members of the general public for a very long time (centuries) is now widened to anyone who can stump up the entry fees. This now allows millions of visitors like me to appreciate the artistic effort that the millions of exhibits represent.

Similarly, the galleries of the Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg are now available for people like me to view because the collections have been protected from what could have been situations of utter devastation to them. The Hermitage treasures were sent to Siberia to escape the ravages of German bombardment during WWII and the collections returned to the Winter Palace and associated buildings during safer eras.

During my guided tour, I only visited a few of the very many possible rooms and galleries available, but they clearly showed the impressive collections that monarchs like Catherine the Great had accumulated. The tour guide gave an excellent commentary via headsets that were the best I’ve ever used.

The trip was far too short but it was a very good introduction to what is a massive collection of fabulous art and architecture. Sometimes when the walls are so full of artwork it's hard to remember to look at the floors and ceilings and appreciate them because they are tremendously stunning as well. I look forward to revisiting them when i return home and make a new Pinterest board of my photos. 

Slainthe!




#7 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral-St. Petersburg


St. Petersburg…15th and 16th June

Two fantastic days that need much more than this diary extract. I feel incredibly fortunate to have been able to join 3 different tours in St. Petersburg, the most incredible city.

Tour 1: The Hermitage Museum
Tour 2- General city sightseeing
Tour 3- The Gulf of Finland

Equestrian Statue of Peter the Great

The influence of Peter the Great is everywhere. The classical buildings are plentiful and impressive in their condition. When the state of bombardment of the Second World War is accounted for it’s amazing that any of the buildings have survived.

According to our very knowledgeable tour guide there is a current ongoing programme of ‘keeping up’ the state of many of the oldest buildings, by the ‘state’. She didn’t go into the intricacies of the funding details but it’s clearly important in St. Petersburg to show off the oldest buildings to great advantage. I am highly impressed by the tasteful decorative colours of the buildings given a little knowledge of the history of their creation. It would be so easy to paint what are essentially brick buildings in garish colours, but that’s not what currently happens in St. Petersburg.

The most important and impressive ones have arresting tones. One could even say ‘Pastel Perfect’ in many cases, maybe even most cases. The classical styles that Peter the Great wanted for his city are so incredibly well-planned and well-maintained. Having visited a few places of his inspirations like Versailles and Rome, the architects that Peter the Great used so long ago did a very fine job in an area that had few of the resources available to the original architects in Rome or Versailles.

I’ve lived in Holland for three years and know just how much effort it takes to form the foundations for building magnificent palaces and large public buildings. Peter the Great’s St. Petersburg land was swampy and needed the innovative creation of canals and reclaimed land to make a port on the Gulf of Finland worthwhile. The lack of local building stone was also a problem that many of the northern European countries, like Holland and Denmark, had to overcome. Brick was a reality yet the products needed to make bricks also had to be imported. The effort put into the creation of the buildings of Peter the Great’s era was immense. And so lastingly worthwhile.

The highlight of the 3 event visit to St. Petersburg was my visit to the Hermitage, though the rest was also very impressive.

Look out for the next post on The Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg - contents that are as impressive as the Vatican Museums.

Slainthe!

Sunday, 17 June 2018

#6 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral -Tallinn


Tallinn!

I’ve really been looking forward to visiting Tallinn - mainly because I’ve heard friends and family who have visited raving about its beauty, but more so because it was one of the few locations that I’ve written about in my contemporary mystery novels that I’d never been to.

Spires of Tallinn
Now I can truly say I’ve been to Tallinn even if only for a very short time. In fact, the duration of my visit was probably on par with Aela’s in ‘Take Me Now’! I didn’t’ kayak in the wide bay at Tallinn but I did manage to get some photos of the area I wrote about and look forward to using them in promotions when I get home.

 
The tour I booked skirted the old town area but took other parts of the city. We visited a ruined monastery, and some other viewpoints but the highlight for me during the trip was the cream slice and tea at a historical building turned into visitor centre /Fishing Museum.

While enjoying the cream roulade we were entertained by two lovely local women who played traditional Estonian instruments that are unique to the country and resembled a zither. They wore traditional costume and gave us a background to both their national dress and the instruments. Excellent stuff and we bought a CD to play at home.

I’d love to have wandered the old town cobbled streets but that wasn’t suitable for hubby so we compromised on the coach tour. There’s still very good reason for returning to Tallinn!

I need say little about the food and drink back on board - it’s always of superior quality and so beautifully presented.  

Slainthe!



#5 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral



Cruising…and more of those lovely talks, Wed 13th June 2018

Today was another day of cruising from Copenhagen to Tallinn, Estonia.  

The port talk on offer today was about Gothenburg by Ian Gunn, and my second ‘historical’ talk was about Peter the Great and his Architects by Simon Rees.

Peter The Great -Wikimedia Commons
Both talks were excellent, again providing lots of lovely details. 

I particularly enjoyed learning more about Peter the Great since I’ve watched some TV series about him via Amazon Prime earlier this year. The Russian-produced series picked a very good look-alike in the actor who portrayed Peter, he definitely resembled him in this painting by Pieter der -Grosse. Peytr was an incredibly productive and intelligent man who created such an unbelievable legacy, whether or not the excesses of Czarist Russia are to your tastes. 

I’d love to say that I did a lot of writing today but it isn’t quite true. I did manage some editing but spent more time being frustrated over the internet connections. Unlike other types of holidays, the ethos of cruising is about chilling out and meeting new people. People can be so different when randomly encountered for the duration of a quick drink.  

Again the musical interludes both afternoon and post dinner were excellent. As was the fabulous haute cuisine and Malbec!

Slainthe!

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Peter_der-Grosse_1838.jpg

#4 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral- Copenhagen



Copenhagen!... 12th June

There were no talks today since it was up for an early breakfast and off for our City Tour of Copenhagen.

Copenhagen 
I’d been to Copenhagen sometime in the early 1980s (1984?) but my memories were very dim. All that seemed memorable from that trip was my kids both having a nasty cold and being out of sorts, though they did sleep on a coach tour out of the city to the Castle of Elsinore/ Esbjerg.

This time around, I was seeing the city with fresh eyes. The highlights of the tour were good choices but the traffic made moving around the city centre a very difficult job for a large and very full coach. Knowing a little bit about the architectural styles from the talks was really useful as we slowly wended our way around the centre.

There were a few short photo-stop opportunities to get a better feel of the surrounding buildings. At the Amalienborg palaces of the current Queen Margaret of Denmark my tour guide had explained that there were royals in residence at two of the three palaces in the ‘oval’ square. One flag bore the emblem of her son and heir, but the guide explained that was a little confusing since the Prince was currently in Brussels signing a NATO treaty or something similar. She reckoned he might be in residence later which explained his flag flying from the rooftop mast.

The other flag was for other members of the Royal family and she guessed that it might be the middle sister of Queen Margaret, who also became a widow sometime recently like the Queen whose French husband died earlier in 2018. Just as the guide was giving more info on the status of the Danish Royals, their State funding etc a limo approached me with a very low key toot. The car was about a metre away from me as it glided slowly past. My guide surreptitiously glanced into the back seat and declared that it did indeed contain Queen Margaret’s sister who was whisked into the underground car park of the palace building that flew the general Royal family flag.

I loved the tour information which enhanced the ship talk, the guide able to fill in a lot of current politics and situations that the population currently find themselves in regarding health, education and well-being.

Our tour included a drive around the Nyhavn harbour area. I found it quite incredible that the terraced housing that was built hundreds of years ago for the Danish Royal Navy is still being lived in, though some buildings are currently used as naval offices. It was all so orderly and so very practical!

There was no opportunity to be inside ‘The Tivoli’ Amusement park but it was fascinating to find out the history and ideology behind its creation, many other parks aping themselves on the Tivoli conception - including the Disneyland park in California.
Ah, that Little Mermaid! 

No tour of Copenhagen can ever be complete without taking in a short visit to see ‘The Little Mermaid’. Small it may be for a national statue but she a cute one- even if the original Hans Christian Andersen story of her is a little bit gruesome. The mermaid’s transformation wasn’t without much pain and neither has the statue had an easy time of it. She has already had lots of bits repaired due to damage inflicted by protesters and others. Her head has been replaced 3 times, her arm once and explosives I 2004 knocked her off her pedestal. Paint splattering has also defaced her but the Danish have soldiered on and had her restored to her full glory, regardless.  

Dare I write it? The day and evening continued with far too much excellent food and wine …and even more entertainment from the excellent musicians aboard the Balmoral.

Slainthe!



#3 Cruising The #Baltic with #FredOlsen’s Balmoral-Kiel Canal



More talks and plenty of entertainment… Monday 11th June

The ship is still cruising and is in transfer on The Kiel Canal 

Talks of the day:
1) Illustrated ‘port’ talk on St. Petersburg by Ian Gunn (all shore talks by him)
2) Historical talk - Christian IV of Denmark by Simon Rees
Christian IV Denmark 

I opted not to go to the ‘Things to Make You Think’ though my hubby attended that one instead of the ‘history’ one that I attended.

As well as the talks there are musical entertainments throughout the day in different venues around the ship and options for both sedentary and active occupations. Some cruisers love the bridge card sessions; others never miss the quizzes or bingo; and if you just love to chill out and do a jig-saw, or read a book that’s all fine too!

Ian Gunn is an informative speaker but my only issue is that he never goes ‘off script’ so the delivery can be a bit static. The research for his presentations is impeccable, though, and makes attendance very worth while.

Simon Rees, in contrast, uses his images as prompts and is a highly entertaining speaker. He is a fabulously knowledgeable man with plenty of ammo available to entertain during his presentations. I had certainly known of Christian IV of Denmark (parts of Sweden and Norway were also within his realm) but I hadn’t realised how influential he had been in creating the architectural style of Copenhagen.

Since the internet connections are vastly expensinve and pretty useless on board, I decided this time around not to fret about communicating on a daily basis. It just doesn’t happen so this Cruise diary is likely to post in one massive splurge.

After more excellent dining and wining we went to the evening entertainment ‘Showtime’ in the Neptune Lounge after dinner, an event that is always highly popular and not easy to find a decent seat at.

on the Kiel Canal
During the bulk of the day we were in transit on the Kiel Canal in order to reach our first port of Copenhagen.

Slainthe!     

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Christian_IV,_from_Christian_IV_and_Anne_Cathrine_(cropped).jpg

#2 Cruising The #Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral

The Talks begin… 10th June 2018

And I’m not referring to my own author talks, rather its the wide options for activities while cruising on The Balmoral. The ship offers a range of talks to suit all tastes. Number one priority for myself and my husband is the series of ‘port’ talks. These are informative talks with loads of visuals which give padding to the basic information given on the shore excursion leaflets. Since I'm booked on various tours at every destination, I find them very useful prior to our actual visit. They tend to be centred on the  historical aspects of the cities visited but also give a good geographical background, interspersed with some of the ancient culture and the current political.

Today’s talk highlights included separate talks on Copenhagen and Tallinn, our first two destinations. I opted not to go to the talk on Faberge since it might have given me too many shopping ideas!

The Kiel Canal
After a morning and an afternoon talk, all too soon it was time to ‘gussy’ up for the Captain’s Welcome Cocktail Party in The Neptune Lounge before our dinner. This is an opportunity to see the senior staff in the flesh since it may be the only time they are visible - though they do often walk the corridors at other times. It was also the first of at least three expected ‘Formal Evenings’ when the dress code is, unsurprisingly, formal. This year my hubby has only packed his tartan trews outfit so the Jardine tartan was happily donned once again. 

After another superb dinner it was time again to toddle up to The Observation Lounge on the 11th deck to view the sea well into the night, it not being at all dark at 11.30 p.m. After a couple of glasses of our favourite Malbec, we drifted off to bed after a leisurely day.

Slainthe!  

#1 Cruising The Baltic with #Fred Olsen’s Balmoral


The Adventure Begins...

hair-moss cap
Rosyth, Scotland, is a great port for me to embark the Balmoral since it’s close to Edinburgh and an easy coach ride away from Aberdeen. Spending one night in Edinburgh the night before is never a hardship since it gave me the opportunity to spend a few hours in the National Museum of Scotland, a site I’ve not visited often enough.

A couple of hours in the section for Ancient History/ Prehistory just wasn’t enough to appreciate what’s on offer there, but with FREE entry to the museum I’ll be hoping to return to sample it again fairly soon.

The Roman treasures are fabulous and mean a lot more to me after a good few years of fairly intensive study of Roman Scotland. Some exhibits need a lot more study, though, like this example of a cap made from hair-moss. I'm intrigued to learn more about the process of making and wearing of such items. 

It was quite nostalgic to saunter down to the Grassmarket area to find a restaurant for dinner and drinks before it got too busy, it being a Friday night. The weather was lovely and warm, with none of the typical Edinburgh winds blowing us off course.   

However, posting photos (or anything for that matter) from the ship is a tediously slow and incredibly expensive business, so I’m aiming to make my posts a brief Cruise Diary with the additional aim of creating some new Pinterest boards for the multitudes of photos when I return home.

My cruise began on Sat. the 9th June with no delays to departure and all as planned. Our cabin balcony was unfortunately on the wrong side of the ship so I didn’t actually see the Forth Bridges properly as I sailed under.  A short time later my hubby and I were having the first of a series of superb ‘haute cuisine’ dinners.  

More cruising updates to follow, whenever I can. 

Slainthe!

Friday, 8 June 2018

#Aye. Ken it wis like this...with Christy Nicholas

Dunkeld Cathedral 
My Friday series continues...
where guest authors are invited to share a post with us about the historical background to their writing. 

Today, we have an extra special treat in that as well as describing some of her own techniques for acquiring a suitable background for her novels my guest, Christy Nicholas, also shares some excellent general advice for writing historical fiction. 

Welcome to my blog, Christy. I love hosting new guests who come bearing wonderful ideas for making the background to our historical fiction the most realistic settings possible for their readers...
Christy Nicholas

Historical fiction research

Historical fiction usually has to walk a fine line between historical accuracy and modern readability. There are many factors to consider when walking that line, and different authors will walk different sides.

I see three major sections within the historical fiction realm.
·         The first is historical fiction with famous people as main characters. Elizabeth Chadwick and Sharon Kay Penman write books within this section, fictionalizing the lives of people within the fame of their time, such as Henry II or Eleanor of Aquitaine.
·         The second is using history as a backdrop for entirely fictional characters. Famous persons may have walk-on roles within the narrative, but the main characters are creations. Edward Rutherfurd or Diana Gabaldon writes in this section.
·         The third is alternate historical timeline books, where the setting is mostly in the historical world, but with a major part different. The Camber Chronicles is a good example of this – ostensibly set in medieval Wales, but there is no Pope and the bishops all perform real magic. Sometimes this section merges with magical realism.
No matter which section you read or write in, attention to historical accuracy can make or break a piece, depending on how well it’s written.

For some people, anything prior to modern times is ‘ancient’ and there is little differentiation between those periods. For an historian, however, or an enthusiast of historical fiction, those differences are important. For instance, a noblewoman of 17th century France would wear a completely different costume than a noblewoman in 12th century France.

Annals of Ulster
When I do research for my books, I first cast a pretty wide net. I might know I want to set my book in, say, 12th century Ireland, but the location and precise year is still up for debate. I start by researching the records available for the time. In this case, the Annals of Ireland are my first source. They are like an annual diary kept by monks that list the events of the time. Births, deaths, battles, marriages, dynastic changes, these are all recorded in dry detail and mostly accurate notation by the scribes of the time.


This is also a great source for historical names, though I tend to simplify the spelling of Irish names so they aren’t horribly difficult for modern readers. For instance, Muirchetach Ua Conchobhairr can become Murtough O’Connor and be much more digestible.

Once I comb through the annals, I can find a nice, juicy conflict to set as the backdrop to my story. Usually dynastic struggles or major raids work well. Strife and war make for exciting times, and few people read historical fiction for the everyday humdrum things. Once I’ve found a conflict, I can zero in on place and year, and discover what life was like in that place and time for my characters.
Are my characters peasants? Nobility? Soldiers, bakers, herdsmen, each lives a different style of life and has different internal and external conflicts. Many of these can be woven into subplots and subtext.

Annals of the Four Masters-
Wikimedia Commons
When writing details of the time period, an author could research the different foods a character is eating (Pro tip: McDonald’s weren’t period!), clothing, the way they made their living, etc.

Speech and idiom is the hardest part. It’s a balancing act. Of course the 12th Century Irish character isn’t speaking anything resembling English. They aren’t even speaking modern Irish. They’re speaking Middle Irish, and no one today outside of a few scholars would easily be able to read it. I certainly wouldn’t be able to write it. Even if it was in England, 12th century language is very different from today’s. If you doubt me, go read some Anglo-Norman works. English as a language didn’t exist – it was a proto-mix of German from the Anglo-Saxon peasants and French from the Norman nobles, with a good dose of Danish from Northumbria and ecclesiastic Latin.

So we use mostly modern English in historical novels. But we can’t use pure modern English, as that would sound strange. Telling someone that the assassin was going to ‘pop a cap’ in his victim’s head just seems… wrong.

Most historical fiction authors sprinkle older words and phrases into modern English and try to limit the anachronisms to give a ‘flavor’ of the time. Sometimes this is easy – often it isn’t. It involves a lot of research, delving into resources such as Etymonline and historical theses. I have an account with Jstor.com which helps me with academic studies on things, as well as academia.edu.

Once you have written in a particular time period, of course, you get a feel for the language. You can just add a couple or words, or phrases, to your characters’ lexicon and the reader is transported to their time and place—if you’ve done it well.

There is always a danger of putting in TOO much flavor. Have you ever had a dish that was so heavily spiced that all you tasted was the seasoning, and not the food itself? Some writing ends up like that. Where you have to sound out the words on the page to make any sense of what was being said. I’ve seen some too-accurate Glasgow accents written this way. Or Cockney. Or deep-south American. Just remember – less is more! And please don’t use phrases like “Avast ye, knavish varlet!”

Swearing is an area that is particularly difficult. A modern person swears differently than someone in the 18th century, 16th century, or the 5th century would. In the past, most swearing was religious in nature – ‘Zounds’, used liberally by Shakespeare, was short for ‘God’s Wounds’. Now, in a society less dominated by religion, we use words more related to physical body functions!

These are little things that must be kept in mind as you are writing your manuscript. Little but important. A glaring anachronism can push a reader right out of the story, and their suspense of disbelief shattered. Often small discrepancies can be forgiven (like rose madder being used to dye cloth in the 12th century when it didn’t become popular until the 13th). These are details only a historian or pedant will care about. Others, not so much (like horned helmets on Vikings, or kilts on a 13th century highlander). Don’t make your 12th century character a Baptist.

Walking the line is difficult, but rewarding. As an author, I stay up at night worrying about someone finding details wrong in my books. So far, I haven’t had any major accusations, but there’s always that concern!

Christy Nicholas
Author of The Druid’s Brooch Series
Celtic Fairies, Fables, and Folklore

See my latest novel, Misfortune of Song! 
http://www.tirgearrpublishing.com/authors/Nicholas_Christy/misfortune-of-song.htm

Buy from Amazon US 
Buy from Amazon UK

I've got a bit of catch-up to do since I've just bought, Legacy of Hunger, the first book in the Druid's Brooch series, but if you're already a fan of Christy's series then you might like to know that....


Misfortune of Time is now available on Pre- Order before its July release.
Amazon US 
Amazon UK









Thank you for guest posting with me today, Christy. My very best wishes for a brilliant launch of Misfortune of Time in July.  

Slainthe! 

https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Annals_of_the_Four_Masters_AD432_entry.jpg

Thursday, 7 June 2018

#Kindred Spirits: Westminster Abbey by Jennifer C Wilson


From Crooked Cat Books - a new addition to the Kindred Spirits Series! 

Friday 8th June 2018 will see the launch of the 3rd book in the refreshingly-different historical fantasy Kindred Spirits Series. From a deep historically-researched base my friend, Jennifer C Wilson, takes the facts and recreates a world where the ghosts of known historical figures interact as though still alive. The quirky aspects are that these ghosts are not all inhabiting their own particular era as in life but they are all inhabiting a particular locality. Jennifer has sent along some pre-launch information for me to share with you... 

In the Kindred Spirits series, we meet the ghosts of historical characters, in a range of contemporary settings. Have you ever wondered what Richard III and Anne Boleyn might have in common, what Mary, Queen of Scots is getting up to now, or what happens when the visitors leave some of the most popular attractions in the country? Well, here’s your chance!

In the third of the Kindred Spirits series, we visit Westminster Abbey, and I hope you enjoy meeting a new community of ghosts. Mind, with modern travel so easy these days, a few faces we’ve already encountered might just show up too…

On hallowed ground…

With over three thousand burials and memorials, including seventeen monarchs, life for the ghostly community of Westminster Abbey was never going to be a quiet one. Add in some fiery Tudor tempers, and several centuries-old feuds, and things can only go one way: chaotic.

Against the backdrop of England’s most important church, though, it isn't all tempers and tantrums. Poets' Corner hosts poetry battles and writing workshops, and close friendships form across the ages.

With the arrival of Mary Queen of Scots, however, battle ensues. Will Queens Mary I and Elizabeth I ever find their common ground, and lasting peace?

The bestselling Kindred Spirits series continues within the ancient walls of Westminster Abbey.
Praise for the Kindred Spirits series
“A light hearted, humorous, and at times tender read which you'll enjoy whether you like history or not.”
“This light-hearted, imaginative read is a new take on historical fiction but make no mistake, this is not only a fun read but an educational tool.”
“A brilliantly unique idea from a distinctive new voice in fiction.”

About Jennifer
Jennifer is a marine biologist by training, who developed an equal passion for history whilst stalking Mary, Queen of Scots of childhood holidays (she since moved on to Richard III). She completed her BSc and MSc at the University of Hull, and has worked as a marine environmental consultant since graduating.

Enrolling on an adult education workshop on her return to the north-east reignited Jennifer’s pastime of creative writing, and she has been filling notebooks ever since. In 2014, Jennifer won the Story Tyne short story competition, and also continues to work on developing her poetic voice, reading at a number of events, and with several pieces available online. Her Kindred Spirits novels are published by Crooked Cat Books and available via Amazon, along with her self-published timeslip novella, The Last Plantagenet? She can be found online at her blog, and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.



My very best wishes for your launch tomorrow, Jennifer. I'm looking forward to reading no. 3 in the series, especially since I was once-upon-a-time singing in Westminster with the Glasgow Girl Guide Choir at a special event to commemorate the 900th year of Westminster Abbey in February 1966. Perhaps some of your ghostly friends were all around me at the time and I didn't notice because it really is a historically immense and amazing place.  

Slainthe! 

Monday, 4 June 2018

#Monday Matters- #How did that Happen? with David Robinson

It's Monday again and my theme of 'How Did That Happen?' continues...

I've invited guest authors to interpret the theme title in any way they choose and, today, I'm delighted to welcome back David W. Robinson, my Crooked Cat Books author friend of a few years now. David was a 'technology-on-the-internet' mentor to many of the newbie numpties-like I was back in 2012 ( if truth be told, I still am). David is an extremely prolific author of different fiction genres and I can heartily recommend him to readers who enjoy humorous cosy mysteries, and to those who enjoy more gripping psychological thrillers. 


His cosy murder mysteries are intriguing and highly entertaining, with a delightful blend of colourful characters. He's here to share how almost incredible life-situations can morph into a scene in a novel, but I'll leave the details to David...

How Did That Happen?
It’s a question I’m often asked by readers of The Sanford 3rd Age Club Mysteries, a series of 16 cosy crime novels, published by Crooked Cat Books. How did I create the characters, how did I decide upon the locations, the crime, the method, the killer?

One particular passage in The I-Spy Murders (Sanford 3rd Age Club Mystery #2) has generated more queries than any other. It has, according to legend, an air of unreality about it, a massive coincidence which stretches suspension of disbelief almost to breaking point.
Joe and his pals in the Sanford 3rd Age Club are in Chester where Brenda is appearing on the reality TV programme, I-Spy, and one of her fellow housemates has been murdered. Poking his nose in as usual, Joe takes a little time out for shopping in the city, and quite by chance he bumps into his brother’s ex-wife, Rachel. They are both the better part of 100 miles from home, and the chances of such a meeting are slightly above nil. 

Joe goes on to discuss family matters with Rachel and her second husband, Derek, and inevitably the discussion turns to argument. Isn’t that always the way? 

So how did it happen? How did I come to write this passage? The answer, surprising as it may seem, is it’s based on a real event, an incident that happened to my wife and I in 2011. 

We like to travel. Health considerations make it difficult for me to tolerate flights longer than about five hours, so we stick to Europe, and our preference is for Spain and the Canary Islands. But we also enjoy holidays here in Great Britain. 

Richard Croft -Public Domain
In 2011, we had already had breaks in Tenerife, and closer to home, Scarborough. In September, we opted for a few days in a caravan in Mablethorpe, Lincolnshire. 

Mablethorpe has a reputation for being full of ‘old’ people. It’s thoroughly unjustified. It might not be the liveliest seaside town in Great Britain, but it has a charm all its own, and it has the advantage that it is close to Skegness. Inevitably, we spent a couple of days in Skeggy.

The sun was shining, the temperatures reaching Mediterranean levels, and as we ambled through the town, we decided that a cup of coffee was in order, and we had our eye on a little, open-air cafe at the junction of Lumley Road and the pedestrianised lower part of the High Street. 
Skegness Clock Tower-
courtesy of David Robinson

As we drew near, I spotted a man who bore an uncanny resemblance to my ex-wife’s current husband (I describe him as her current husband because at one point, she was going through husbands at the same rate as I go through cars, and like my cars, most of her husbands were second-hand.) 

As we got closer I became more and more convinced that it was him, and if he was there, it was practically certain that she was. My wife went into the cafe to check, and came out wearing the kind of grim look usually associated with a diagnosis of terminal athlete’s foot. It was indeed my ex-wife and her husband. 

I was all for walking in the opposite direction, but my wife insisted she wanted coffee, and she wanted it there. You can probably guess that married twice, I know better than to argue, and we joined the ex-Mrs R and spouse. 

It was the most appalling conspiracy of fate. We live in Manchester, and we were 150 miles from home, she lives in Leeds, and she was 100 miles from home, and yet here we were drinking coffee, trying to be civilised. She and I have been divorced for almost 40 years, and by now most of the bitterness has faded. I’m not one to bear a grudge (but I do make an exception in her case). 

I was so gobsmacked by this unexpected encounter with a part of my life I prefer to think of as a black hole, that I elected to include it in one of my Sanford 3rd Age Club Mysteries. Given Joe Murray’s irritability, it seemed to be the perfect vehicle to let him vent his spleen.
And that’s it. For all the foregoing light-heartedness of the previous account, the contentious scene in The I-Spy Murders is a fictionalised account of a real event, right down to the family argument which followed. 

It’s not the only real-life incident that I paint into my novels. There was the famous appreciation of toasted tea cakes in The Filey Connection, for example, Joe’s health struggles in The Summer Wedding Murder and Costa Del Murder, and latterly, the architectural idiosyncrasies of the hotel in Peril in Palmanova. But that meeting in The I-Spy Murders is the most talked about, because of its unlikelihood. 

We’re going back to Mablethorpe later this year, and it’ll be interesting to see who turns up this time.

The I-Spy Murders, Sanford 3rd Age Club Mystery #2, by David W Robinson, is published by Crooked Cat Books, and exclusive to Amazon.

BUY HERE 

Learn more at: Amazon UK
and Amazon Worldwide

Discover more Sanford 3rd Age Club Mysteries at: http://www.dwrob.com/my-books/the-sanford-3rd-age-club-mysteries/

Follow David Robinson at: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dwrobinson3

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DW96

Thanks for visiting today, David. Should you have any highly embarrassing, or sensitive encounters, on your forthcoming Mablethorpe visit of 2018, then I'm sure it'll appear as a humorous scene somewhere in your future writing! My best wishes for continued success all of your current and future writing. 

Slainthe! 

Mablethorpe - http://www.geograph.org.uk/photo/4178358